On June 26, 2019, Governor Ned Lamont signed a $43.4 billion budget for the 2020 and 2021 fiscal years. The biennial budget addresses the projected $3.7 billion budget deficit for the period, but still increases spending by 1.7% in the 2020 fiscal year, and by 3.4% in the 2021 fiscal year. Although a letter dated

Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Alan Lieberman and Louis Schatz authored the article “2017 Survey of Connecticut Tax Law Developments” which was published in Connecticut Bar Journal. This survey summarizes Connecticut tax legislation enacted, court decisions rendered, and administrative guidance published by the DRS during 2017.

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Connecticut Tax Developments is published by the State and Local Tax Practice as a service to clients and friends. The contents are intended for informational purposes only, and the advice of a competent professional is required to address any specific situation. Reproduction or redistribution is permitted only with attribution to the source.
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Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Alan E. Lieberman and Louis B. Schatz authored the article “2016 Survey of Connecticut Tax Law Developments” which was published in Connecticut Bar Journal. Coming off a tumultuous year in 2015, which involved significant tax increases, the Governor generally remained true to his pledge in 2016 not to increase Connecticut taxes,

The 2017 regular legislative session ended at midnight on June 7, 2017, with Governor Malloy and the Connecticut General Assembly unable to agree on a biennial budget for the period from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019, or on a strategy for how the state will address the estimated $5 billion deficit projected for that period.
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In his February 2016 State of the State address, Governor Malloy announced that his administration would be adopting a new approach to state budgeting in light of what he characterized as “the new economic reality” facing Connecticut and the nation.  The Governor’s proposed changes to the biennial budget, including significant rescissions, funding reductions and state

Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Alan E. Lieberman and Louis B. Schatz authored the article “2015 Connecticut Tax Law Developments” which was published in Connecticut Bar Journal. Coming off what was a relatively quiet year in 2014, the year 2015 was a tumultuous year for Connecticut tax law changes. The changes enacted during 2015 will

2015 has been a tumultuous year for Connecticut taxpayers. It started with projections of large state budget deficits for the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years and the adoption of of the second largest tax increase in Connecticut history (only four years after the adoption of the largest such tax increase). By year end, executive branch

The recently concluded 2014 legislative session of the Connecticut General Assembly finished with the enactment of a flurry of budget and tax legislation that was significantly influenced by eroding state budget projections and the impending state elections.

In the face of a dramatic reduction in the projected budget surplus for the current fiscal year, from