ERISA/Pension and Employee Benefits

Recent coronavirus-related guidance from the IRS (Notice 2020-29, issued on May 12) aims to give Code Section 125 cafeteria plan (“cafeteria plan”) participants some relief from irrevocable group health benefit and health and dependent care flexible spending account (“FSA”) elections made prior to the pandemic.

Under Notice 2020-29, an employer who offers group health benefits

On Friday, March 27, 2020, the President signed into law the Bipartisan Proposal for Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (also known as the “CARES Act”).  The Cares Act is a massive 2.2 trillion dollar package that contains a number of provisions to assist the United States economy combat the impact of COVID-19.  This

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).  Among other things, the FFCRA requires employers with less than 500 employees to (i) provide up to 12 weeks of partially-paid leave to parent caregivers of minor children home as a result of COVID-19 related school

Now that the dust has begun to settle with respect to understanding the retirement plan and IRA changes in the federal law known as Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the federal “SECURE Act”) that was signed into law in December of last year,  tax planning is underway for the changes

On Wednesday, March 11, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in Notice 2020-15 published its first formal guidance addressing the developing public health emergency wrought by the novel coronavirus, COVID-19.  The Notice provides that a high deductible health plan (HDHP) that covers testing for and treatment of COVID-19 before satisfaction of the plan’s minimum deductible will

On December 20, 2019, President Trump signed into law H.R. 1865, the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (now Pub. L. 116-94) (the “Appropriations Act”), which, among other things, contains the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act (the “Act”). The Act is a significant piece of retirement legislation which seeks to expand access

On December 20, 2019, the President signed legislation repealing the excise tax, otherwise known as the “Cadillac tax,” on high cost health insurance plans.  Both houses of Congress had adopted the legislation the day before, as part of a federal spending package.

The excise tax was a component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Without

Effective October 1, 2019, a new Connecticut law, P.A. 19-177, changed the existing requirements in Connecticut General Statutes Section 20-298b that apply to the ownership of architectural firms doing business as professional corporations incorporated in Connecticut. The new law now permits these architectural firms to have more than 33-1/3% of their voting stock owned by

In May we wrote about a Connecticut Senate Bill 435 (S.B. 435) and certain proposed federal legislation which would have created incentives for Connecticut employers to help their student loan-burdened employees pay down their debt.

The 2019 legislative session adjourned in June, and at that time, S.B. 435 had been referred to the Committee on

One hotly debated aspect of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) has been the so-called “Cadillac Tax” on high-cost health benefits, currently slated to take effect in 2022.  The Cadillac Tax is a 40% excise tax on the amount of employer-sponsored health care coverage which exceeds $10,200 for individuals and $27,500 for families.  (Higher thresholds apply